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20130810
20130810
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
to go south of richmond. just the way i was cultivated and mississippi was a scary place because emmitt till was murdered there. and i still remember ibm blacked and when we go together i wonder what people think and all day ever say is come back. i remember you from your service and never sure president. but i was a little gun shy with how i was brought up but we had a wonderful time. >> calling on the republican line. >> caller: with a race race, every time a black person kills a white person and it is o.k. but if a white person kills a black person they set out it is a race. it is not race all the time. we are past all that we need to except people who they are and quit complaining. >> guest: who is complaining? >> caller: the blacks always complain. >> guest: whitey think we're always explaining our circumstances? >> caller: they just complain get over the past. >> guest: you are from the south. you're from the south to the seveners get over the loss of the confederate war of the state's? >> caller: i am past that. the south lost. >> host: can you give us a little bit of your histor
. is great to hear and i'm originally from mississippi and grew up in this south where my parents graduated from school. i dropped out of school but eventually i went back and went to college and moved to ohio and got a job. even the church and some time that people buy your history in america and how we treat one another and even the slavery. i'm a big fan of frederick douglass also. in a piece that he wrote, he writes the real question that all commanding question here is whether american justice and american liberty and american civilization, the american christianity can be made to include and protect all the rights of all american children. as black people we feel not educated by history and other countries and you know as i talk to people from where i came from my struggles with my parents if you live in the south, even sometimes the black people seem like they have not comprehended what i'm talking about. the struggle and where we came from and where we are now. >> host: let's get a response from randall robinson. >> guest: well, i understand very much how you feel. i think that you
are on alert in the mississippi river valley where continued heavy rain could trigger intense flooding. brian is live for us with more. >> reporter: much of the midwest and southeast is pummeled by torrential rains and ten inches of rain falling on friday flooding hundreds of homes and businesses in states like colorado, kansas, missouri and tennessee. floodwaters sweeping through roads and highways in colorado. 1.3 inches of rain following in only half an hour causing this fast moving mudslide along highway 24 killing a man. muddy water carrying homes and debris. three others are still missing. listen to this woman who held on to dear life as the home rushed right by her. >> at that moment i knew that the water was getting higher and coming over it. then the bottom broke off and it went through. i said i have to get out of here. i was screaming for help and i watched them rescue a dog. i watched the house go by. i watched cars go by. >> reporter: missouri, 15 inches of rain in two-day period. in some areas in southwestern parts of the state, floods killing a four-year-old boy and his mother
. mississippi has just the one clinic in jackson. that one, the republicans are fighting to close that one down as well and it seems like they may be close to doing it. in north dakota, same deal. there's one clinic for the whole great big state. this spring republicans passed a law that aims to shut down that one last clinic. in alabama, there are five clinics that provide abortion services. republicans passed laws in the spring that would close three of the five clinics. in virginia, the number of clinics right now is at 20. it's slated to go to four. in north carolina, 16 facilities, republicans passed new restrictions that are expected to close 15 of those. 15 of the 16. so this is before the republican party in north carolina launched its efforts to shut down clinics and this is likely to be after. it is sometimes difficult to explain this larger trend of republicans creating these new impossible to meet demands on abortion clinics. these legal requirements designed to shut clinics down. in the aning a stran ing ing a, imagine what that means. in the specific, when it's happening it seems
out dirt farmers all over the midwest and the mississippi valley handing them one-way tickets to the vehicle city as flint nicknamed itself. the newcomers slept in shacks, tents and railroad cars. earl's family rented a tiny house, all he could afford on his factory pay. after the war earl tried farming again, failed again and returned to flint for good. everett grew up a city boy with no agricultural ambitions. after graduating from high school in 1933, he enlisted in general motors as an apprentice tool and dye maker at 50 cents an hour. the job could disappear in a day. if a supervisor wanted to hire his brother-in-law, he created ap opening by handing a worker a yellow slip, the color of termination. bachelors were laid off while married men with lower seniority kept their jobs. the supervision, they had no control either, everett recalled. you could come in today and have a desk and have a yellow slip on there that said you're all done. on november 12th, three welders conducted a short pro-union sit-down demonstration. in protest, a department in the plant stopped working
is violence. >> keenan leaks of jackson, mississippi, once thought it was impossible for black students to be falling so short in education. >> ask the kids in my neighbor hood and the parents and coming to find out there was a 70% dropout rate in the neighborhood. parents want a choice. even poor parents want a choice. why should only rich children have a choice? >> the work is being applauded not only by parents, students and businesses but also politicians and gospel recording artist marvin sapp. >> when we see how we are using our young children at an alarming rate, i believe that somebody needs to step to the plate. you know what, i take that challenge of trying to bring about change. >> i'm a doctor, phd, coming out of a housing project in milwaukee, wisconsin. the only thing that got me to the point you and i are having this interview is an education. >> power of an education for dr. howard fuller is the power of faith. he acknowledges there is still a lot of work that needs to be done. >> getting message out. one of the best ways i have ever heard. thank you. >>> president obama
facility only an hour and a half away: the institute for marine mammal studies in gulfport, mississippi. the teams in gulfport and new orleans prepare for his arrival and celebrate by giving him a name. suzanne: they had a name contest for him, and the name that won was apollo. and as you probably know, apollo is the sun god, so it is a very fitting name for this little dolphin that survived a terrible sunburn. sam: over the past six months, suzanne has become very attached to little apollo. suzanne: i'm going to miss his little face. in the beginning, it's very sad to see a helpless, vulnerable animal like that. my heart smiles, because i know that the team at audubon did a fantastic job. we did everything that we needed to do to help rescue him. good kid. coming to get you. they're coming to get you. yes, they are. sam: when the time comes for apollo to leave for his new home, there's only one thing left for suzanne to say. suzanne: bye! sam: and away he goes off to a new life in his new home. valerie: apollo had a really rough time. he was near death with this horrible, horrible sunb
not doing anything, probably not saying anything. >> host: next call from robert in mississippi. >> caller: how are you doing? nice talking with you today. in 1997-1998 i was in middle schools in mississippi and dr. carson came to speak to students at the school and i wanted to know, was he making a national tour to come to different states in different schools because we also had to read his book and right research ports in middle school and i wanted to know was the plan on making those? >> host: what did you make of dr. carson's visit? >> this is the reason i am calling. one of the things that stood out to me in his boat was he had a name for a management problem and in my calendar that is one of the things with young people on the rise. and rising murders and found a way to challenge energy in directing and elsewhere and i wanted to know, that stuck out to me and i wrote on the topic but it was 97-98 so i don't remember but i want to know could he bring that back to the united states and young people? >> host: tell the temper story as well. >> guest: i will. thank you so much. i have be
: and you aren't very patient. caller you are on the line. >> caller: originally i have from mississippi and grew up in the south and i dropped out but eventually i went back in and went to college and moved to ohio and got a job. sometimes at church talk about history in america and how we treat one another eye of a big fan of frederick douglass also with the peace that he wrote the real question for the command in question whether american justice and american the ready, american civilization is the american in christianity can be made for ever all citizens. but not to be educated by history, as i talk to people about where i came from, my struggles, living in the south, talking to black people they see they do not comprehend what we talk about with the struggle in to where we came from. >> host: we will get a response from randall robinson. >> guest: i a understand very much how you feel. you can have often much reason or expectation of anything different. i have taken a the position particularly because in my view it is our do that doesn't mean we expect they will materialize in my l
, your thoughts on the president's remarks yesterday. west mississippi, independent line. caller: i completely agree with the president. mr. snowden is not a patriot. one of the most important thing is facing our country now is this whole issue of fiber security. fibrous security is more important to our nation than the budget deficit problem. it is more important than our dependence on foreign oil. we have to be more aggressive with our cyber security protection. when have to be more aggressive with regard to battling against these groups who want to break into our cyber systems that control everything from our financial markets to our power grids and everything else. houston,ther troy from texas. republican line. caller: thank you for taking my call. i think he is a patriot. the government cannot listen to every phone call and every conversation we have. that information is our private property. we should be able to sell it as we see fit. cyber security is no excuse for setting up being cut or a police state. this is a country and it seems like he is a patriot to me. host: suzanne
for a mississippi california girl, the latest on the man underhunt for the alleged abductor and suspected killer. >>> ex-humaning the truth, researchers will dig up secret graves at a florida reform school. what is behind the new efforts to uncover this school's deadly history? >>> also the american town where a 4-year-old, there is he, the 4-year-old who is now mayor again. you're watching msnbc. my mother made the best toffee in the world. it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. i never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. at truecar.com, we offer our users... guaranteed upfront savings. the result? truecar users save... over $3,000... on average. save time, save money, and never overpay. visit truecar.com if you've got it, you know how hard
opportunity. let me conclude with this. generations, if this is 20th-century mississippi -- or 20th-century mali, young people have risked their safety and given their lives to give the -- get the education that has opened their potential. she spoke to and for the world's children. her message was clear. we want school and education for will child, and we continue the journey to our destination of these and education. nobody can stop us. we will speak up for our rights and bring change to our voice. all of you are helping to answer that call. i thank you for your service and your commitment, your creativity and courage. let's work together in individual nations and around the world until there are no more >> to fall through, no more barriers to run into and no more threats to their safety as they pursue their education and their dreams. if you want peace, work for justice, it has been said. we know this cuts to the root of if we wantallenge -- justice and peace, we must work for education. thank you so much, and i am happy to take your questions. [applause] >> is that working? mayb
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)